politicalprof:

The shape of American inequality. From Andrew Hacker.

newshour:

Check how your income would be taxed at different countries’ marginal tax rates.
And a look at the history of taxes in the U.S. from Paul Solman.

newshour:

Check how your income would be taxed at different countries’ marginal tax rates.

And a look at the history of taxes in the U.S. from Paul Solman.

(via rubenfeld)

FACT: Reagan’s ‘82 and ‘84 deficit reduction plans were 80% tax increases.

(via motherjones)

jonathan-cunningham:

abbyjean:

In a typical year around 35-40 percent of households don’t owe any federal income tax. But most of them pay a significant share of their incomes in other taxes — particularly payroll taxes, as the CBO report points out:
People in the bottom four-fifths of the income scale pay more in payroll taxes than federal income taxes, on average.  The Tax Policy Center estimates that payroll taxes (including both the employee and employer shares) outweigh federal income taxes for 82 percent of households.  (Most economists agree that workers pay not only the employee share of payroll taxes but the employer share as well in the form of lower wages.)
Working-poor and middle-class Americans pay a much larger share of their incomes in payroll taxes than high-income people do (see graph).  That  gap has increased over the past 30 years, the CBO report shows.  In addition, the share of federal revenues coming from payroll taxes has gone up while the share coming from income taxes has gone down.
When you count all federal taxes (income, payroll, and excise), even people in the bottom fifth of the income scale are net federal taxpayers, on average.  This group, whose after-tax incomes averaged just $17,700 in 2007, paid 4.7 percent of their incomes in federal taxes that year.
Moreover, these figures don’t consider the significant state and local taxes that virtually all Americans pay — taxes that, like federal payroll and excise taxes, tend to demand more of lower-income people relative to their incomes. (via Off the Charts Blog)

“53%” my ass.

jonathan-cunningham:

abbyjean:

In a typical year around 35-40 percent of households don’t owe any federal income tax. But most of them pay a significant share of their incomes in other taxes — particularly payroll taxes, as the CBO report points out:

  • People in the bottom four-fifths of the income scale pay more in payroll taxes than federal income taxes, on average.  The Tax Policy Center estimates that payroll taxes (including both the employee and employer shares) outweigh federal income taxes for 82 percent of households.  (Most economists agree that workers pay not only the employee share of payroll taxes but the employer share as well in the form of lower wages.)
  • Working-poor and middle-class Americans pay a much larger share of their incomes in payroll taxes than high-income people do (see graph).  That  gap has increased over the past 30 years, the CBO report shows.  In addition, the share of federal revenues coming from payroll taxes has gone up while the share coming from income taxes has gone down.
  • When you count all federal taxes (income, payroll, and excise), even people in the bottom fifth of the income scale are net federal taxpayers, on average.  This group, whose after-tax incomes averaged just $17,700 in 2007, paid 4.7 percent of their incomes in federal taxes that year.

Moreover, these figures don’t consider the significant state and local taxes that virtually all Americans pay — taxes that, like federal payroll and excise taxes, tend to demand more of lower-income people relative to their incomes. (via Off the Charts Blog)

“53%” my ass.

ilovecharts:

Fair Share?
Contribution of individual and corporate income tax to government and social infrastructure over time. I made this graph from official tax revenue data of the US government. It shows the ratio of percent of GDP of individual tax revenue to percent of GDP of corporate tax revenue over time. As you can see, even though they consume far more public resources and earn greater profits, the share being paid by corporations to our infrastructure, roads, transportation, education of workforce, etc has decreased greatly over time, shifting the burden of all public infrastructure to labor.
Blue is people. Gold is corporations. What’s graphed is the bill for running the country. It goes from 50-50 to individuals paying most of the bill.
-miraclesawake

ilovecharts:

Fair Share?

Contribution of individual and corporate income tax to government and social infrastructure over time. I made this graph from official tax revenue data of the US government. It shows the ratio of percent of GDP of individual tax revenue to percent of GDP of corporate tax revenue over time. As you can see, even though they consume far more public resources and earn greater profits, the share being paid by corporations to our infrastructure, roads, transportation, education of workforce, etc has decreased greatly over time, shifting the burden of all public infrastructure to labor.

Blue is people. Gold is corporations. What’s graphed is the bill for running the country. It goes from 50-50 to individuals paying most of the bill.

-miraclesawake