reuters:

Susanna Mancini cherishes a photo of herself at 27: a smiling face behind a pair of dark sunglasses. On it, she scrawled to her future husband: “Too bad you can’t see my eyes. I am so proud of my tough yuppie stare!”
Her professional pride propelled her early career as a lawyer. She was successful and well paid for it. She kept working when her first child was born and was promoted to a more senior position in Citibank after her second child arrived.
But her career eventually succumbed to something Mancini never expected would end her rise at the bank - her husband’s even bigger success. She quit in 2005 when her six-digit income was overtaken by his seven-digit one.
She is far from alone, according to a new study from the Federal Reserve, due to be published shortly.
It shows that between 1993 and 2006, there was a decline in the workforce of 0.1 percent a year on average in the number of college-educated women, with similarly educated spouses.
Read more: Educated women quit work as spouses earn more

reuters:

Susanna Mancini cherishes a photo of herself at 27: a smiling face behind a pair of dark sunglasses. On it, she scrawled to her future husband: “Too bad you can’t see my eyes. I am so proud of my tough yuppie stare!”

Her professional pride propelled her early career as a lawyer. She was successful and well paid for it. She kept working when her first child was born and was promoted to a more senior position in Citibank after her second child arrived.

But her career eventually succumbed to something Mancini never expected would end her rise at the bank - her husband’s even bigger success. She quit in 2005 when her six-digit income was overtaken by his seven-digit one.

She is far from alone, according to a new study from the Federal Reserve, due to be published shortly.

It shows that between 1993 and 2006, there was a decline in the workforce of 0.1 percent a year on average in the number of college-educated women, with similarly educated spouses.

Read more: Educated women quit work as spouses earn more

good:

In an OWS Era, Americans Are Much More Aware of Class Tension 
It looks like Occupy Wall Street’s message has resonated even after Zuccotti Park cleared out. A new Pew Research Center survey reveals that two-thirds of the public believes there are “very strong” or “strong” conflicts between America’s rich and poor—a number that’s up 19 percentage points since 2009. According to the survey, income inequality now trumps tensions arising from race or immigration—popular answers only a few years before. 
Read more on GOOD→

good:

In an OWS Era, Americans Are Much More Aware of Class Tension 

It looks like Occupy Wall Street’s message has resonated even after Zuccotti Park cleared out. A new Pew Research Center survey reveals that two-thirds of the public believes there are “very strong” or “strong” conflicts between America’s rich and poor—a number that’s up 19 percentage points since 2009. According to the survey, income inequality now trumps tensions arising from race or immigration—popular answers only a few years before. 

Read more on GOOD→

(via thenewrepublic)

occupyonline:

U.S. production is up, while wages remain stagnant. That means that while workers continue to work long, hard hours bringing more profit to corporations, rather than “trickling down” those profits into the wages of the workers, executives are keeping their profits in the hands of stockholders. Less wages mean less buying power in an economy where the price of products, education, food, medicine and housing accommodation grows. This pattern cannot continue without an eventual and painful crash for millions of hard working citizens. 
It’s not whining or entitlement, it’s math and foresight.

occupyonline:

U.S. production is up, while wages remain stagnant. That means that while workers continue to work long, hard hours bringing more profit to corporations, rather than “trickling down” those profits into the wages of the workers, executives are keeping their profits in the hands of stockholders. Less wages mean less buying power in an economy where the price of products, education, food, medicine and housing accommodation grows. This pattern cannot continue without an eventual and painful crash for millions of hard working citizens. 

It’s not whining or entitlement, it’s math and foresight.

(via praxis-makesperfect-deactivated)

Just six members of the Walton family, heirs to the Walmart fortune, possess wealth equal to that of the entire bottom 30 percent of Americans.

The insane wealth of Walmart’s founding family - Salon

That’s 92 million Americans.

Next time I shop at a big-box store, I hope I remember that.

(via nickdouglas)

(via joshsternberg)

By the numbers:

think-progress:

Republicans are willing to raise taxes on more than 100 million households

to spare 345,000 millionaires from a tiny surtax.

Something doesn’t add up.